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NIDays: Graphical System Design Conference

Attend this premier event on Monday, October 21, in Washington, DC, to learn about the latest technologies, best practices, and application trends for designing test, measurement, and embedded systems. 

With over 40 technical sessions, hands-on workshops, and an aerospace and defense track led by industry leaders, NIDays DC is designed to maximize interaction, professional development, and exchange of ideas.

Here are 6 reasons to register:   

Wolf

Stu Wolf is the Director of the University of Virginia Institute for Nanoscale and Quantum Scientific and Technological Advanced Research (nanoSTAR ) and also holds a joint appointment as a professor in Departments of Materials Science and Engineering and Physics. At the University of Virginia he is continuing to push the frontiers in spintronics and quantum information science. His group utilizes the spin degree of freedom in novel oxide heterostructures using spin torque to manipulate the magnetism in nanomagnetic structures.

Highley

A Generalizable Strategy for the 3D Printing of Hydrogels from Non-viscous Photocrosslinkable Inks. Advanced Materials, 2017, 29: 1604983. ABSL. Ouyang, C.B. Highley, W. Sun, J.A. Burdick

NanoDays at UVA

NanoDays at UVA

Saturday, April 7 2018

9am-3pm

Wilsdorf Hall

Nanodays is an annual event is held in conjunction with UVa's Engineering Open House.  This family-friendly, fun and free event will be at Wilsdorf Hall on Whitehead Road opposite the football stadium.  All ages can enjoy hands-on nano, giant nanotubes, lab tours, nano games, design competition and the popular Oobleck pit!

Griffin

Don Griffin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Virginia. After his training in Biomedical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles, Don joined the faculty at the University of Virginia in 2017.

His lab works on creating advanced biomaterials to support both fundamental science and translational approaches to tissue regeneration. They engineer biomaterials using a unique combination of microscale geometric control and novel chemistries.

Lampe

Kyle is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Virginia, and by courtesy, Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience. He was previously a Ruth L. Kirschstein NIH NRSA postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University with Prof. Sarah Heilshorn in the department of Materials Science and Engineering. Kyle completed his Ph.D. and B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Colorado, Boulder and the Missouri University of Science and Technology (Rolla, MO), respectively.

Berger

B.S. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1999Ph.D. University of Delaware, 2006Post-Doc: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 2006-2009

"We utilize synthetic biology and protein engineering to address emergent challenges across diverse areas such as sustainable production of green materials, advanced biomanufacturing, improving drug bioavailability and combating antimicrobial resistance."

Caliari

B.S. ​Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 2007M.S. ​Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010​​Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013Post-Doc ​Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 2013-2016

"We design biomaterials to better understand how cells interpret signals from their environment during disease progression and tissue regeneration."

Cai

B.S. Physics, Lanzhou University, 2006Ph.D. Materials Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2012Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University, 2013-2017

"We aim to understand and control the interactions between soft active materials and living systems to solve challenges in energy, health, and environmental science."

Liheng Cai, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

 

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